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Saturday

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Responsibility without possessiveness

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by Brian Haven
@ 11:45 AM

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I've been reading Peter M. Snege's The Fifth Discipline for my Design, Management, and Organizational Behavior class taught by Dick Buchanan.

At the end of the book there is a citation of a poem written by a Lebanese poet named Kahlil Gibran that captures the idea of leaders feelings toward their vision through his story of parents and children. I just thought is was somewhat inspiring:

Your children are not your children.
They are the sons and daughters of life's longing for itself.
They come through you, not from you.
And though they are with you, they belong not to you.
You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls,
For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow, which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them, but strive not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.
You are the bows from which your children as living arrows are sent forth.
The archer sees the mark upon the path of the infinite, and he bends you with his might that the arrows may go swift and far.
Let your bending in the archer's hand be for gladness;
For even as he loves the arrow that flies, so he loves the bow that is stable.

Khalil Gibran, The Prophet (New York: Alfred A. Knopf), 1923.

 

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